Ann Gwilliam of Little Dean Forest of Dean (General)

by MIKELEWIS237, Sunday, June 14, 2020, 12:39 (96 days ago)

Ann Gwilliam the daughter of John and Martha Gwilliam was possibly age just 16 when she married my third Great Grandfather James Smith (Corker) on 29th February 1808 at St. Ethelbert Church Little Dean.
Would be helpful if any one could please help me in confirming the following.
Could Ann have been just 16 when she married and secondly could James have been a Corker/Corkcutter? by profession.
My thoughts are that Ann could have been 16 when she married with the consent of her parents or gardian and James could have been a (Corker/Corkcutter).
James and Ann had 3 children James Smith (a Brush Maker) in Gloucester who was born in 1808,Ann born 1817(a Shoe binder) and William born 1820 (Tailor) all three children were baptised at St.John the Baptist Gloucester.
Mike

Ann Gwilliam of Little Dean Forest of Dean

by sidtoomey01 @, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, Sunday, June 14, 2020, 23:17 (96 days ago) @ MIKELEWIS237

https://www.ancestry.com.au/search/collections/4732
Gloucestershire , England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials Register 1538-1813.
Littledean 1783-1812
Page 9 of 96.

The above register has a record

" Ann of John & Martha Gwilliam baptised on 20th May 1792"

Sid Toomey

Ann Gwilliam of Little Dean Forest of Dean

by sidtoomey01 @, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, Monday, June 15, 2020, 11:51 (95 days ago) @ MIKELEWIS237

Baptism Registers available on Ancestry will show the following.

(a) Ann baptised on 27th July 1817.
Fathers occupation recorded as Corkcutter.
Page 3 of 8 in the 1817 Register

(b) William Baptised on 6th August 1820
Fathers occupation recorded as Corkcutter.
Page 3 of 6 in the 1820 Register.

The first Child was born before 1813 so was recorded in the old style registers where no occupation was recorded.
I trust this is what you might have been looking for.

Sid Toomey

Ann Gwilliam of Little Dean Forest of Dean

by MPGriffiths @, Monday, June 15, 2020, 16:47 (95 days ago) @ sidtoomey01

Found this information on Rootschat

'From The Book of Trades or Library of Useful Arts 1811 (Volume 2) '

"The cork-cutter's business requires but little ingenuity; the knives used in the operation have a peculiar construction, and they must be exceedingly sharp. The knife is almost the only instrument wanted in the trade. The principal demand for corks is for the purpose of stopping bottles; these are cut by men and women, who receive a certain price per gross for their labour. Cork-cutters sell also corks by the gross. It is on the blackest and dirtiest of all the trades, and not very profitable either for the master or the journeyman."

Ann Gwilliam of Little Dean Forest of Dean

by MIKELEWIS237, Monday, June 15, 2020, 18:06 (95 days ago) @ MPGriffiths

Hi.
Many thanks for your message with reference to 'The Cork cutter' most appreciated.
Mike

RSS Feed of thread
powered by my little forum