Kate COLLICOTT b1902 Berry Hill, & family (General)

by Jefff @, West London, Middlesex, Wednesday, September 13, 2017, 20:07 (88 days ago) @ shepway

Thanks Mike, especially for the 1939 & 1911 records. Can't help noticing that Kate shared her first name with her mother-in-law and her sister-in-law.
Interesting to see this Collicott clan originate from Chelmsford, Essex - my earlier searching in FreeBMD suggested this surname may originate from the South-East esp Essex.
J

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Finally for now; I've found just one Collicott in this site's WW1 Servicemen database. it would appear to be Kate's father Thomas Charles Collicott;

Record_ID: 1015
Year: _
Surname: COLLICOTT
Forename: T C
Rank: Private
Regiment: Army Reserve
Service_Number: _
Residence: Berry Hill
Notes_1: Enlisted 01_December_1915 _ _
Notes_2: _
Newspaper: _
Date_Published: _
Image: _
Soundex: C423


The database also includes two Delaneys, it seems likely that these are our William Charles Delaney and his twin brother George Ernest, both born 1894, as mentioned by Mike Shepway in the previous post;

Record_ID: 1371
Year: _
Surname: DELANEY
Forename: William
Rank: Private
Regiment: 2nd Battalion, Monmouthshire Regiment
Service_Number: _
Residence: Christchurch
Notes_1: _
Notes_2: _
Newspaper: _
Date_Published: _
Image: _
Soundex: D450

Record_ID: 1370
Year: _
Surname: DELANEY
Forename: George
Rank: Private
Regiment: 2nd Battalion, Monmouthshire Regiment
Service_Number: _
Residence: Christchurch
Notes_1: _
Notes_2: _
Newspaper: _
Date_Published: _
Image: _
Soundex: D450


We've already covered William's marriage, to Kate in 1928.

FreeBMD has this partial record which appears to be brother George's:

Surname First name(s) Spouse District Vol Page
Marriages Jun 1935 (>99%)
Delaney George E Bloxham Monmouth 11a 83

From which we can find his bride
Surname Given Name Spouse District Volume Page
Marriages Jun 1935
Bloxham Elizabeth Delaney Monmouth 11a 85

Cannot find an "obvious" birth record for Elizabeth, not a rare name but none in our area. However can find one child;

Surname First name(s) Mother District Vol Page
Births Dec 1935 (>99%)
Delaney George R Bloxham Monmouth 11a 30

(GlosBMD gives second name as Rex)

But sadly;
Record_ID: 263909
Entry_Number:
Year: 1938
Month: Feb
Day: 15
Surname: DELANY
Forenames: George Rex
Residence: St Lucy Hosp Longford
Age_at_death: 2
Officiating_Minister: Wyndham Jones vicar
Event: Burial
Cause_of_death:
Memoranda:
Notes:
Register_Reference: P82 IN 1/16
Page_No: 73
Parish_Chapel: Christchurch
Soundex: D450

I cannot find any more definite records for Elizabeth on FreeBMD or in PRs, but do find

Surname First name(s) Mother/Spouse/Age District Vol Page
Deaths Dec 1965 (>99%)
DELANEY GEORGE E 71 F.OF DEAN 7B 442

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Ref little George's death at "St Lucy Longford, I've never heard of this hospital before, so thought I'd look-up it's interesting history.

"CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL.

In 1866 a free hospital for children of the poor was begun next to St. Lucy's Home of Charity between Kingsholm and Longford. The home, a converted villa east of the Tewkesbury road, was occupied by the sisters of St. Lucy, an Anglican community founded in 1864 by Thomas Gambier Parry of Highnam to train nurses and tend the sick in their homes. By 1866 the sisters, who were sent to many parts of the country, nursed some patients in the home. Gambier Parry also conceived the idea for the children's hospital in connexion with the home and paid much of the building costs. The hospital, a brick building designed by William Jacques, opened in 1867 with 22 beds. Children of the poor from any distance were admitted and out-patients were treated at a house in Bell Lane. The hospital was supported by subscriptions and donations.

In 1872 the sisters of St. John the Baptist from Clewer (Berks.) took over the work of the sisters of St. Lucy. In 1876 Gambier Parry moved the home to a large house at the corner of Hare Lane and Pitt Street. The new home included a ward for fee-paying incurables from 1885 and adjoined the hospitals out-patient department, which occupied that building, known as College Gardens, from 1873 to 1905, when a new dispensary opened in the hospital's grounds. In 1921 the sisters gave up their work at the hospital and the management committee made new arrangements, introducing payments for patients' keep according to means. Further changes in management came in 1928 when the Clewer sisters resumed their work, and from 1929 children sent by the Gloucestershire Royal Infirmary were admitted. The Clewer sisters were succeeded at the hospital in 1939 by the nursing sisters of St. John the Divine from Deptford (Kent). In 1941 accommodation was increased but in 1947 the hospital was closed and sold to the city corporation. The proceeds of the sale supported a fund for the relief of sick children. In 1951 the charity of George Peters, who by will proved 1909 had provided a bed in the hospital, was added to the fund, which in 1971 had an income of £2,000. The hospital, which was used by the Gloucestershire Royal Hospital as a nurses' home until the mid 1970s, was demolished in 1979. St. Lucy's Home was closed in 1933 following the withdrawal of the Clewer sisters."

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/glos/vol4/pp269-275#h3-0005


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